Annotated Rogerian Argument Outline

Overview

Reflect on the goal of a Classical Argument: to take a position on one side of an issue and try to persuade the audience by refuting the opposing position. Now, consider that a Rogerian Argument objectively explores both sides of the same issue, identifying common ground and proposing a compromise based on that common ground.

Instructions

This is an annotated outline, meaning it explains the purpose of each paragraph. Read through this document, then use your understanding of the paragraph goals to construct your own outline. A skeleton outline is included at the end of the document for you to copy/paste and build your own outline. Be sure to include all of these paragraphs in the correct order.

Before you begin

Consider the rhetorical situation:

Your Audience: Two groups who share a common problem but disagree about how to solve it.

Your Purpose: To explain each perspective to the other side so that their common goal or value becomes clear, then to propose a compromise that brings each side together to move towards achieving the goal.

Your Role: Although you may prefer one approach over the other, your role is to be an objective mediator who reduces the conflict by proposing a compromise that benefits both sides. Word choice and tone must be free of bias.

Parts of a Rogerian Argument • Introduction:

Provide some history and context for the issue and provide an overview of the controversy or disagreement surrounding it. Appeal to pathos to make a connection with the audience so that they, too, feel a need to reach a compromise. Then, state a thesis that is a Claim of Fact, noting the disagreement and suggesting a way forward through compromise.

• Body Paragraphs:

1. Overview of Side A. Keep the tone objective and support this paragraph by using research that accurately illustrates the views of that side. (Think of this as Side A’s “main claim.”)

2.

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